How much snow do you get in Charlottesville?

Snow in Charlottesville

Most of my clients moving to Charlottesville ask this question. Every snow in Charlottesville is not a/the Snowpocalypse. Also, weather folks in Charlottesville are pretty awesome. Many years ago I was meeting with some new potential buyer clients who were new to Charlottesville. There was a supposed storm coming in that weekend and they asked whether they should […]

A Few Surprises from NAR’s Home Buyer and Seller Profile

Really? 22% of 18-24 year olds used print?

One of the best things the National Association of Realtors produces is the annual Profile of Homebuyers and Sellers. Each year, I dig into it to see what nuances I haven’t picked up on, what trends are emerging or dominating, and other tidbits of the homebuyer and seller that I can learn and apply to my practice.

I wrote eight years ago that homebuyers would, whenever we emerge(d) from the recession, focus more on the intrinsic value of a home than they would on perceived equity. I’d say that that has been borne out. 

I know this: I’m more knowledgable and prepared to represent clients thanks to this report.

A few highlights and surprises:

Really? 22% of 18-24 year olds used print? Surprised.

Really? 22% of 18-24 year olds used print?

A bit surprised by the differences between 2013 and 2014 – expected tenure is down … recession ending?

Expected tenure in homes - 2013

and 2014:

?EXHIBIT 2–31 EXPECTED LENGTH OF TENURE IN HOME PURCHASED, FIRST-TIME AND REPEAT BUYERS, AND BUYERS OF NEW AND PREVIOUSLY OWNED HOMES

Honestly, I’m shocked. Shocked by the 33%.

33% Don_t Compromise? Really?

And then this. This is interesting, a bit troubling, and an opportunity to be better than websites. I tell my clients that my goal is to be better than Google/Zillow …

2013 - Usefulness of information sources

In 2014, no real surprises here, but interesting and intriguing trends here.

2014 Usefulness of information sources

What Will 29 Look Like when VDOT is Finished?

Keeping up with what’s happening on 29 is a job – it takes effort, time, and expertise. For that, you’ll have to go to Charlottesville Tomorrow.

For now, have a look at this animation that shows what 20 might look like when they’re finished.

 

 

Two things unanswered (and likely to be unanswered until we have hindsight) –

1) What will traffic/delays be while the solution is implemented?

2) Will all the businesses survive the solution?

Albemarle Gets a Transportation Planner + Urban Density

Two stories at Charlottesville Tomorrow this week are worth noting (in truth, all their stories are), in part because they mesh with a conversation last night with a potential new client contemplating moving to Charlottesville from out West.

Two points he made:

1) They are considering moving to Charlottesville in part because they want a higher and better quality of life, and hope to achieve that with less traffic and a shorter commute.

2) He expressed concern that Charlottesville hadn’t grown in two decades. I advised to look at the population growth in Albemarle County (related: Should I move to Charlottesville?) Albemarle’s population has grown remarkably over the past 20 years while Charlottesville has remained fairly steady.

On to the Charlottesville Tomorrow stories:

Supervisors debate Albemarle’s growth area planning philosophy

“I really do think we are in a new era of the development area,” Sheffield said. “Without a doubt, I think things are going to move faster and faster and we need to get ahead of it.”

The population of Albemarle is projected to be 134,196 in 2030. The plan assumes nearly 15,000 additional dwelling units will need to be in place to absorb that growth.

The supervisors’ monthly review of the plan will continue in December when they are expected to take up chapters on transportation and parks. Echols said she is hoping the plan will go to a public hearing in April.

Albemarle to hire transportation planner

“Like many counties evolving from a rural level of service to an urban one, Albemarle is seeing a changing role for managing transportation issues,” said Mark Graham, the county’s community development director.

Graham said that 65 percent of Albemarle residents will be in the urban area by 2040, compared with around 45 percent today. The county estimates there are now 104,580 residents.

This. Charlottesville and Albemarle need to get along.