Tougher licensing standards? If only.

North Carolina legislators are considering a bill
that would require additional training for all real estate salespersons and
brokers in charge of real estate offices, and would reclassify all newly
licensed agents as “provisional
brokers.”

Officials with the North
Carolina Association of Realtors and the North Carolina Real Estate Commission
say they are pursuing these changes to improve the level of professionalism in
the industry, and to better serve real estate
consumers.

Provisional brokers, as
defined by the law, must be supervised by a “broker-in-charge,” and each
physical real estate brokerage office must have a designated broker-in-charge.
Provisional brokers cannot become a broker-in-charge, and they must complete a
post-licensing education process consisting of 90 hours of classroom instruction
or equivalent training or experience within two years of licensing in order to
end the provisional status of their license.

North Carolina legislators are considering
a bill that would require additional training for all real estate salespersons
and brokers in charge of real estate offices, and would reclassify all newly
licensed agents as “provisional
brokers.”

Officials with the
North Carolina Association of
Realtors
and the North Carolina Real Estate
Commission
say they are pursuing these changes to improve the level of
professionalism in the industry, and to better serve real estate
consumers.

Provisional
brokers, as defined by the law, must be supervised by a “broker-in-charge,” and
each physical real estate brokerage office must have a designated
broker-in-charge. Provisional brokers cannot become a broker-in-charge, and they
must complete a post-licensing education process consisting of 90 hours of
classroom instruction or equivalent training or experience within two years of
licensing in order to end the provisional status of their
license.

If they do not
complete the training in this time, their license will be terminated, according
to the proposed bill.

More strict
licensing laws would benefit everybody, consumers and Realtors, in so many ways.
Too many people practice this profession in the literal sense – they “practice”
because they do not do it full time nor depend on it.

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