Southern Pines development in Fluvanna

It is hard to ascertain from this story in The Central Virginian which side (if either) is right.

While it was clear that the Fluvanna County Planning Commission was unhappy with Barry Meade’s proposed Southern Pines development, some members felt they did not have the necessary legal grounds to reject it. The project calls for 239 by right rural cluster lots on 603 acres on Rte. 630 (Mountain Laurel Road) in the Columbia district.

Speakers cited concerns about a dwindling water supply, displaced wildlife, increased traffic, overcrowded schools, overburdened emergency services, and lack of infrastructure. Some castigated the commission for penning a set of zoning ordinances they viewed as “disastrous.”

And then the Developer’s attorney speaks –

“We appreciate the citizen input,” said Boyd, but reiterated that Southern Pines is a by right development. “We are fully confident that we have addressed the ordinances’ requirements.”
She told the commissioners that Meade was trying to create a neighborhood that anyone would be happy to live in. While the homeowners association would not own the open space, the landowner would continue to grow and harvest trees and would grant homeowners an easement around the houses that could contain walking trails.

By right is one thing; but should developers be held responsible for providing the necessary infrastructure that will enable their developments and the surrounding community, will be sustainable? At least Albemarle is not the only County with controversial developments!

Technorati Tags: , ,

(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)

1 Comment

  1. E. Jones September 6, 2005 at 12:58

    “…but should developers be held responsible for providing the necessary infrastructure that will enable their developments and the surrounding community, will be sustainable?”

    Yes absolutely. Developers should ALWAYS be held accountable for providing the infrastructure upgrades needed to make their developments a sustainable part of the community they are building in. This is already a standard requirement in other cities (los Angeles, CA for example) where additional development would constitute a drain on existing services and water resources. To do otherwise is a give-a-way to developers leaving the rest of the community to pick up the bill by way of increased taxes and fees.