Eminent domain case

I had to steal this from the Inman blog today as
it is potentially such an important case for anybody and everybody who is
interested in maintaining their private property
rights.

…An important property rights
case involving homeowners in New London, Conn., who are trying to keep their
private property from being seized by the government and developers will reach
the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. The case will test the practice of eminent
domain, which allows a person’s property to be condemned and the land used for a
greater public use. The practice is lawful with one little exception known as
the Fifth Amendment, which lends some protection against government
interference…. In this case, the government offered homeowners a fair price
for their properties so it could develop the land for public use…. On the
other side, city officials argue that eminent domain should apply to cases of
economic development since it would improve the local economy.

I had to steal this from the Inman blog today as it is potentially such an
important case for anybody and everybody who is interested in maintaining their
private property
rights.

Remember the
Constitution?

An important
property rights case involving homeowners in New London, Conn., who are trying
to keep their private property from being seized by the government and
developers will reach the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. The case will test the
practice of eminent domain, which allows a person’s property to be condemned and
the land used for a greater public use. The practice is lawful with one little
exception known as the Fifth Amendment, which lends some protection against
government interference. “Nor shall property be taken for public use, without
just compensation.” In this case, the government offered homeowners a fair price
for their properties so it could develop the land for public use. Some
homeowners simply said they didn’t want to sell, and that their neighborhood
could hardly be considered a slum. They argue the circumstance doesn’t meet the
legal requirements of eminent domain. On the other side, city officials argue
that eminent domain should apply to cases of economic development since it would
improve the local economy. A ruling is expected by June.

–Jessica Swesey, Inman News

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